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Governor Corbett Signs New PA Budget

The budget was enacted with just minutes to spare from the Saturday midnight deadline.

For the second year in a row, Gov. Tom Corbett beat a midnight deadline and signed a state budget that includes no new taxes. 

"Hopefully we're developing a habit, and I think the Pennsylvania citizens will appreciate that habit of on time," Corbett said after the signing ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda.

The final $27.66 billion budget package includes several significant victories for the Corbett administration, including a tax incentive aimed at luring a Shell Oil Co. plant to Beaver County, a measure to alter how teachers are evaluated, and a proposal to tame rising prison costs through targeted sentencing, the Post-Gazette reported.

The spending plan, approved by the  on Thursday and the late Friday, maintains funding at current year levels for public universities and most school districts, but some fiscally struggling districts received a little extra money, the Patriot-News reported. It cuts funding for human services by $84 million and eliminates the Department of Public Welfare's cash assistance program, starting Aug. 1.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Jake Corman, R-Bellefonte, said the budget is based on Senate Republicans' belief that controlling government spending and rejecting tax hikes is crucial to moving Pennsylvania toward economic recovery. 

"In these fiscally challenging times you have to make tough choices, but we also recognize that providing a quality education to kids of all ages is one of our most important responsibilities," Corman said. "This budget includes funding to help counties and local agencies provide essential social and health services and programs for senior citizens and those with physical and mental disabilities."

While acknowledging what he calls "hurtful cuts to vulnerable Pennsylvanians," the state’s new budget contains important provisions intended to address the root of the state’s fiscal woes, said , D-Canonsburg.

“The bottom line is jobs and we have taken aggressive steps to improve the economy and employment picture,” Solobay said. “Economic growth and the jobs that come with it should make future budgets easier on everyone.”

The budget includes an aggressive plan to create a historic economic development project in Beaver County and tax incentives for a wide array of employers to create jobs.

Along with the tax credits required to close the deal for the construction of the $3 billion ethane “cracker” plant, the budget contains an expansion of the film tax credit to include its use in sound studios, and a more than doubling in the credit for hiring unemployed workers.

Lawmakers also adopted a “single-sales factor” for apportioning corporate net income taxes, finishing the shift from payroll and assets to sales when calculating business taxes. The change encourages employers to keep their manufacturing as well as their retail facilities in the state.

Other changes to the tax code allow the transfer of family farms to extended family without applying the inheritance tax, and provide credits to businesses that open up in renovated and preserved historic buildings.

What do you think of the budget? Tell us in the comments section and take our poll.

Roger July 03, 2012 at 11:53 AM
Wrong! The PA funding remained the same, the Fed stimulus money was over-and-beyond past funding to local districts. The local districts were challenged on what to do with the 'extra' money. The problem, the 'extra' money was taken to be an ongoing stream. When the stream stopped, then the outrage of "cuts" was heard through the districts. No cuts, rather just back to pre-stimulus levels.
cc July 04, 2012 at 03:49 PM
I would love to cut the welfare system, but who's going to pay for the people to get free healthcare under obamacare. Millions more will be added to welfare when obamacare takes place and it is the people that have jobs are going to be paying this with an increase in taxes or their going to cut more money from our schools.
cc July 04, 2012 at 03:52 PM
Renee they did not cut money to education in this budget, they cut cash money to welfare starting August 1. I'm all for cash assistance being cut from people that stay home and do nothing. But do think they shouldn't cut money to Senior Citizens that only get 500 a month to live on nor the truly disabled that don't qualify for Social Security because we got fakers on SS, SSI and SSDI that collect but then are out playing golf or running marathons. :The spending plan, approved by the House on Thursday and the Senate late Friday, maintains funding at current year levels for public universities and most school districts, but some fiscally struggling districts received a little extra money, the Patriot-News reported. It cuts funding for human services by $84 million and eliminates the Department of Public Welfare's cash assistance program, starting Aug. 1"
JustMe July 05, 2012 at 08:23 PM
Roger you are totally correct there.
jane August 10, 2012 at 05:49 AM
I am a bit late at getting around to reading this, but I believe this article proves your point exactly: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/24/dorothy-june-hairston-bro_n_1699765.html Philadelphia Charter School Mogul, Charged With Defrauding $6.5 Million In Tax Dollars, spread this far and wide! People need to know what a fraud these schools are and the corrupt politicians pushing for them are most likely grabbing kickbacks. This whole thing stinks of corruption!

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